Lesson 1 of5
In Progress

Summary of Titus

SUMMARY

The Apostle Paul addresses Titus as his “loyal child” in the faith that they share. While Paul is in an undisclosed location, he will be on his way to Nicopolis in Epirus (western Greece), and Titus is on Crete. Matters of the ordering of the church in Crete are taken up, and much of the letter is concerned about the creation of a Christian ethos, living a life under grace, and baptismal regeneration.

SO WHAT?

Passages in the Letter to Titus have an enduring importance in the liturgical life of the church. The most important are those concerning the qualities of a bishop and baptismal regeneration.

WHERE DO I FIND IT?

The Letter to Titus is the seventeenth book in the New Testament. Clustered with 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy (the other two “Pastoral Epistles”), it stands near the end of the “Pauline corpus,” the collection of letters attributed to the Apostle Paul (the books of Romans through Philemon).

WHO WROTE IT?

According to the letter itself, it was written by the Apostle Paul to Titus on Crete, from which Paul has left. Yet, this letter is generally regarded as pseudonymous, written after the death of Paul by an anonymous writer who sought to impersonate Paul in a post-Pauline situation.

WHEN WAS IT WRITTEN?

The Letter to Titus is widely considered to be pseudonymous, written after the death of the Apostle Paul. Since the letter has terminology that is found generally in certain Christian writings of the second century, it is considered to have been written late in the first century or even early in the second.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

The Letter to Titus emphasizes the Christian community’s ability to be a force for good in society and expresses concerns about leadership in the early church, assuming that good order, good teaching, good people, and good conduct will assist the promotion of the gospel.

HOW DO I READ IT?

Read the letter as one written to impersonate Paul in a situation that the author faced in his own time and place. Seeking to represent Paul in order to give authority to what he has to say, the author calls upon readers (ostensibly Titus, but implicitly more than him) to imitate Paul in his fidelity to the gospel, even in trying circumstances. In order to do this letter justice, one should read it (as well as the other Pastoral Epistles) in light of the seven undisputed letters of Paul, where one finds quite different emphases and teachings.

Enter the bible BW logo

Sign Up or Login

More resources for a deeply formed faith from Luther Seminary: